Categories
Uncategorized

Quotes by Cus D’Amato

Quotes by Cus D’Amato:

“Boxing is entertainment, so to be successful a fighter must not only win but he must win in an exciting manner. He must throw punches with bad intentions.” [Heller, 13]

“People who are born round don’t die square.” [Heller, 19]

“There are very few new things in this world, very few. That’s why people that are young, if they’re smart, try to profit from the experience of an older guy so they won’t have to go through all the pain and suffering. But a certain amount of pain and suffer is good, because it makes a person think they’ve learned.” [Heller, 25]

“A boy comes to me with a spark of interest, I feed the spark and it becomes a flame. I feed the flame and it becomes a fire. I feed the fire and it becomes a roaring blaze.” [Heller, 63]

“There is no such thing as a natural puncher. There is a natural aptitude for punching and that is different. Nobody is born the best. You have to practice and train to become the best.” [Heller, 96

Cus D’Amato on how the most important lessons were not learned in the gym, but were learned at the dinner table:
“I never teach until I’ve spoken to the fighter. I have to first determine his emotional state, get his background, to find out what I have to do, how many layers I have to keep peeling off so that I get to the core of the person so that he can recognize, as well as I, what is there.” [Heller, 60]

On how the recognition and acknowledgement of fear is the crucial lesson he taught and was ignored by other trainers:
“Fear is the greatest obstacle to learning in any area, but particularly in boxing. For example, boxing is something you learn through repetition. You do it over and over and suddenly you’ve got it. …However, in the course of trying to learn, if you get hit and get hurt, this makes you cautious, and when you’re cautious you can’t repeat it, and when you can’t repeat it, it’s going to delay the learning process…When they…come up to the gym and say I want to be a fighter, the first thing I’d do was talk to them about fear…I would always use…the same example of the deer crossing an open field and upon approaching the clearing suddenly instinct tells him danger is there, and nature begins the survival process, which involves the body releasing adrenalin into the bloodstream, causing the heart to beat faster and enabling the deer to perform extraordinarily feats of agility and strength…It enables the deer to get out of range of the danger, helps him escape to the safety of the forest across the clearing…an example in which fear is your friend.
The thing a kid in the street fears the most is to be called yellow or chicken, and sometimes a kid will do the most stupid, wild, crazy things just to hide how scared he is. I often tell them that while fear is such an obnoxious thing, an embarrassing thing…nevertheless it is your friend, because anytime anyone saves your life perhaps a dozen times a day, no matter what how obnoxious he is, you’ve got to look upon him as a friend, and this is what fear is…Since nature gave us fear in order to help us survive, we cannot look upon it as an enemy. Just think how many times a day a person would die if he had no fear. He’d walk in front of cars, he’d die a dozen times a day. Fear is a protective mechanism….By talking to the fighters about fear I cut the learning time maybe as much as half, sometimes more, depending on the individual.” [Heller, 60]

About the importance of psychological elements in boxing:
“The next thing I do, I get them in excellent condition….Knowing how the mind is and the tricks it plays on a person and how an individual will always look to avoid a confrontation with something that is intimidating, I remove all possible excuses they’re going to have before they get in there. By getting them in excellent condition, they can’t say when they get tired that they’re not in shape. When they’re in excellent shape I put them into the ring to box for the first time, usually with an experience fighter who won’t take advantage of them. When the novice throws punches and nothing happens, and his opponent keeps coming at him…the new fighter becomes panicky. When he gets panicky he wants to quit, but he can’t quit because his whole psychology from the time he’s first been in the streets is to condemn a person who’s yellow. So what does he do? He gets tired. This is what happens to fighters in the ring. They get tired. This is what happens to fighters in the ring. They get tired, because they’re getting afraid….Now that he gets tired, people can’t call him yellow. He’s just too “tired” to go on. But let that same fighter strike back wildly with a visible effect on the opponent and suddenly that tired, exhausted guy becomes a tiger….It’s a psychological fatigue, that’s all it is. But people in boxing don’t understand that.” [Heller, 61]

D’Amato on his methods evolved and used over the years and used for tutoring Tyson:
“I tell them the first time they’re going to fight, the night before they probably won’t sleep. I can’t offer them any consolidation other than the fact that the other guy went through the same thing, and when they get down to the fight and enter the dressing-room, especially if they’re in an amateur fight, the room is full of possible opponents, because they don’t know who they’re going to fight, and everybody looks calm, confident and smiling and all the new boy is aware of is that terrible thump in his chest, and he’s intimidated by their attitude and their confidence. What he doesn’t realize is that they look at him and they see the same thing in him as he sees in them, because by an exercise of discipline he also puts on a superficial appearance of confidence…We go on now into the ring. Half the time they’re walking when they go down to the ring as though they’re going to the gallows. So when they climb those stairs, I never call a fighter yellow. Knowing what he goes through, the very act of climbing into that ring stamps him a person of courage and discipline.” [Heller, 67]

“So now they get into the ring…The other guy probably looks bigger, and stronger and better conditioned and real muscular and when he start to loosen up he looks more experienced. This is the novice fighter’s mind and imagination exaggerating everything, which is what the mind does. Nothing is ever as bad as the imagination makes it, not even death. A person doesn’t realize what’s making him nervous unless he understands why he’s getting scared, which is the natural, normal thing. When he understands it he accepts it as such. Then it doesn’t become as intimidating, which is the reason why I take the boy step by step until actually the bell rings to fight. I take them that way so that hopefully by the time they get to fight they’ve experienced these different feelings which are often intimidating by themselves. “Cus said it was going to be like this,” so that they don’t feel they are inferior or less prepared than their opponent.” [Heller, 67]

“Now, when they go in and face the opponent and the bell rings, for the first time…they’re facing reality, and suddenly a relative calmness comes over them. Relative. They’re still scared but it isn’t that terrible intimidating unknown thing….But the moment the blows start to be thrown, the effort to throw punches has begun, he gets calm, because now this is something he’s been prepared to cope with….However, I should add that at no time does fear disappear. It’s just as bad in the hundredth fight as it was in the first, except by the time he reaches a hundred fights or long before that he’s developed enough discipline where he can learn to live with it, which is the object, to learn to live with it…” [Heller, 67]

“Every fighter that ever lived had fear. A boy comes to me and tells me that he’s not afraid, if I believed him I’d say he’s a liar or there’s something wrong with him. I’d send him to a doctor to find out what the hell’s the matter with him, because this is not a normal reaction. The fighter that’s gone into the ring and hasn’t experienced fear is either a liar or a psychopath…” [Heller, 67]

On the importance of will:
“When two men are fighting, what makes you’re watching is more a contest of wills than of skills, with the stronger will usually overcoming skill. The skill will prevail only when it is so superior to the other man’s skill that the will is not tested….
As times as you see a fellow get tired in the course of a fight, note that he gets tired when pressure builds up, after he gets hurt or he’s been in some kind of doubtful situation, not being able to control the situation. That’s when he starts getting tired. That’s why when two good fighters get to fight, they’re head to head, so to speak, they won’t give an inch and they’re using all their skills and ability, until maybe about the seventh or eight or ninth round, one fighter start to visibly weaken. It only means he’s reached a point where he no longer can stand the pressure. He’s now become dominated, because when two people fight it’s very much like two armies. They seek to impose their will on one another.” [Heller, 76]

On how Mike gave him reason to live:
“I often say to Mike, “You know, I owe you a lot,” and he doesn’t know what I mean….If he weren’t here, I probably wouldn’t be alive today….Nature is smarter than people think. Little by little we lose our friends that we care about and little by little we lose our interest until finally we say what the devil am I doing around here if I have no reason to go on? You get used to everything. Even the idea of dying is something a person gets used too, and he accepts it. I believe that people die because they no longer want to live, they have no motivation to stay alive. But I have a reason with Mike here, and he gives me the motivation. I will stay alive and I will watch him become a success, because I will not leave until that happens, because when I leave he not only will know how to fight, he’ll be able to take care of himself. I don’t succeed when I make a guy become Champion of the World. I succeed when I make that fellow become Champion of the World and independent of me…” [Heller, 86]

On being a professional:
“I believe a man is a professional when he can do what needs to be done no matter how he feels within. An amateur is an amateur in his attitude emotionally. A professional is an professional in the way he thinks and feels and in his ability to execute inder the most trying conditions. The ability to do what needs to be done regardless of the pressure and do it with poise, with no reflection of his inner feeling or conflict if it exists, is what makes a professional. It has nothing to do with their knowledge. I’ll show you many amateurs with far superior knowledge and ability than top professionals.” [Heller, 97]

“When you get hit that’s when you’ve got to be calm. A professional fighter has to learn how to hit and not get hit, and at the same time be exciting. That’s what professional boxing is about. You’ve got to be clever, you’ve got to be smart, and not get hit, and when you’re able to do this, you’re a fighter.” [Heller, 97]

“If you can hit your opponent with two punches, you don’t hit him with one. Get off with some bad intentions in there. Believe in yourself. A guy can feel it if you don’t believe in yourself. Set your mind to make yourself do it.” [Heller, 97]

On the hero and the coward:
“I tell my kids, what is the difference between a hero and a coward? What is the difference between being yellow and being brave? No difference. Only what you do. They both feel the same. They both fear dying and getting hurt. The man who is yellow refuses to face up to what he’s got to face. The hero is more disciplined and he fights those feelings off and he does what he has to do. But they both feel the same, the hero and the coward. People who watch you judge you on what you do, not how you fee.” [Heller, 97]

On Mike’s progress in the short time:
“The boy can do everything a champion is required to do, and if he does everything that he’s capable of doing, I tell you he may go down as one of the greatest fighters of all time…as a professional my judgment of a fighter are detached. I never allow my personal feelings to get involved, no matter how much affection I may have for him, and I can honestly say I have a very deep affection for him, and an admiration, having watched him come from where he was to what he is, because I know what it takes to do what he’s done and what he’s doing. I feel I was a part of it. It’s almost like watching yourself. You never know how much you contributed to it, but the result is there and you like to think you had something to do with it.” [Heller, 98]

On his dream of a heavyweight champion at the top:
“Many people who have been around boxing all those years never had a champion, certainly a heavyweight champion….For that to happen in one’s lifetime is so improbable. I got Floyd Patterson, then, here, at the age of 76, I was fortunate to come in contact with this young man who has, in my opinion, all the requirements to be a champion that I believe he’s going to be, maybe the best that ever lived.” [Heller, 110]

“Boxing is a contest of character and ingenuity. The boxer with more will, determination, desire, and intelligence is always the one who comes out the victor.” [Fire, 36].

Talking to the thirteen year old Mike about fear:
“Boxing is a sport of self-control. You must understand fear so you can manipulate it. Fear is like fire. You can make it work for you: it can warm you in the winter, cook your food when you’re hungry, give you light when you are in the dark, and produce energy. Let it go out of control and it can hurt you, even kill you….Fear is a friend of exceptional people.” [Fire 50]

Categories
Uncategorized

Mike Tyson Vs Frank Bruno 2 1996

Tyson’s 3rd fight since his comeback was against Frank Bruno, and this time it was a title match. In his fourth attempt Bruno had captured the WBC title from Oliver McCall who on his part took the belt from Lennox Lewis. Tyson and Bruno met once before in Febuary 1989. Then Tyson defended his heavyweight crown when he knocked Bruno out in 5.

This time Frank Bruno was the champion and due to defend his title. But again Bruno could not match with the power of Mike Tyson. It was all over in round 3 when the ref stepped in to save bruno.
They can say he is over the hill, but he will always have dynamite in both hands. They are nuclear-powered. He is a dangerous dude and he always will be- Bruno

Categories
Uncategorized

Tyson Books

Mike Tyson: Money, Myth and Betrayal
by Montieth M. Illingworth (Hardcover – October 1991)

Fire & Fear: The Inside Story of Mike Tyson
by Jose Torres (Paperback – January 1990)

The Inner Ring.
The Set-Up of Mike Tyson and the Un-Crowning of Don King. by Rudy Gonzalez with Martin A. Feigenbaum

Bad Intentions: The Mike Tyson Story
by Peter Heller, Da Capo Press (Paperback – September 1995

Tyson: The No-Holds-Barred Biography of the World Heavyweight Champion.
by Peter Heller, Robson Books, London (1989)

Iron Mike: A Mike Tyson Reader
by Daniel O’Connor (Editor), Introduction George Plimpton (Paperback – May 2002

A SAVAGE BUSINESS : THE COMEBACK AND COMEDOWN OF MIKE TYSON
by Richard Hoffer

Blood Season: Mike Tyson and the World of Boxing
by Phil Berger (Paperback – March 1996)

The Long Round : The Triumphs and Tragedies of the Men Who Fought Mike Tyson
by Dominic Calder-Smith

Mike Tyson: The Release of Power
by Reg Gutteridge, Norman Giller (Paperback – March 1996)

Mike Tyson, the boy who would be king
by William McNeil

Blood Season: Tyson and the World of Boxing
by Phil Berger

Down for the Count: The Shocking Truth Behind the Mike Tyson Rape Trial
by Mark Shaw (July 1993) – Book that puts a lot of question marks on the trial and shows mistakes made in that trial

Heavy Justice: The State of Indiana V. Michael G. Tyson
by J. Gregory Garrison, Randy Roberts (Hardcover – April 1994) – Yet another book written by lawyers and judges that says the trial was wrong

Heavy Justice: The Trial of Mike Tyson (Sweet Science: Boxing in Literature and History)
by Randy Roberts, J. Gregory Garrison (Paperback – April 2000)

Categories
Uncategorized

Quotes by Cus D’Amato

“Boxing is entertainment, so to be successful a fighter must not only win but he must win in an exciting manner. He must throw punches with bad intentions.” [Heller, 13]

“People who are born round don’t die square.” [Heller, 19]

“There are very few new things in this world, very few. That’s why people that are young, if they’re smart, try to profit from the experience of an older guy so they won’t have to go through all the pain and suffering. But a certain amount of pain and suffer is good, because it makes a person think they’ve learned.” [Heller, 25]

“A boy comes to me with a spark of interest, I feed the spark and it becomes a flame. I feed the flame and it becomes a fire. I feed the fire and it becomes a roaring blaze.” [Heller, 63]

“There is no such thing as a natural puncher. There is a natural aptitude for punching and that is different. Nobody is born the best. You have to practice and train to become the best.” [Heller, 96

Cus D’Amato on how the most important lessons were not learned in the gym, but were learned at the dinner table:
“I never teach until I’ve spoken to the fighter. I have to first determine his emotional state, get his background, to find out what I have to do, how many layers I have to keep peeling off so that I get to the core of the person so that he can recognize, as well as I, what is there.” [Heller, 60]

On how the recognition and acknowledgement of fear is the crucial lesson he taught and was ignored by other trainers:
“Fear is the greatest obstacle to learning in any area, but particularly in boxing. For example, boxing is something you learn through repetition. You do it over and over and suddenly you’ve got it. …However, in the course of trying to learn, if you get hit and get hurt, this makes you cautious, and when you’re cautious you can’t repeat it, and when you can’t repeat it, it’s going to delay the learning process…When they…come up to the gym and say I want to be a fighter, the first thing I’d do was talk to them about fear…I would always use…the same example of the deer crossing an open field and upon approaching the clearing suddenly instinct tells him danger is there, and nature begins the survival process, which involves the body releasing adrenalin into the bloodstream, causing the heart to beat faster and enabling the deer to perform extraordinarily feats of agility and strength…It enables the deer to get out of range of the danger, helps him escape to the safety of the forest across the clearing…an example in which fear is your friend.
The thing a kid in the street fears the most is to be called yellow or chicken, and sometimes a kid will do the most stupid, wild, crazy things just to hide how scared he is. I often tell them that while fear is such an obnoxious thing, an embarrassing thing…nevertheless it is your friend, because anytime anyone saves your life perhaps a dozen times a day, no matter what how obnoxious he is, you’ve got to look upon him as a friend, and this is what fear is…Since nature gave us fear in order to help us survive, we cannot look upon it as an enemy. Just think how many times a day a person would die if he had no fear. He’d walk in front of cars, he’d die a dozen times a day. Fear is a protective mechanism….By talking to the fighters about fear I cut the learning time maybe as much as half, sometimes more, depending on the individual.” [Heller, 60]

About the importance of psychological elements in boxing:
“The next thing I do, I get them in excellent condition….Knowing how the mind is and the tricks it plays on a person and how an individual will always look to avoid a confrontation with something that is intimidating, I remove all possible excuses they’re going to have before they get in there. By getting them in excellent condition, they can’t say when they get tired that they’re not in shape. When they’re in excellent shape I put them into the ring to box for the first time, usually with an experience fighter who won’t take advantage of them. When the novice throws punches and nothing happens, and his opponent keeps coming at him…the new fighter becomes panicky. When he gets panicky he wants to quit, but he can’t quit because his whole psychology from the time he’s first been in the streets is to condemn a person who’s yellow. So what does he do? He gets tired. This is what happens to fighters in the ring. They get tired. This is what happens to fighters in the ring. They get tired, because they’re getting afraid….Now that he gets tired, people can’t call him yellow. He’s just too “tired” to go on. But let that same fighter strike back wildly with a visible effect on the opponent and suddenly that tired, exhausted guy becomes a tiger….It’s a psychological fatigue, that’s all it is. But people in boxing don’t understand that.” [Heller, 61]

D’Amato on his methods evolved and used over the years and used for tutoring Tyson:
“I tell them the first time they’re going to fight, the night before they probably won’t sleep. I can’t offer them any consolidation other than the fact that the other guy went through the same thing, and when they get down to the fight and enter the dressing-room, especially if they’re in an amateur fight, the room is full of possible opponents, because they don’t know who they’re going to fight, and everybody looks calm, confident and smiling and all the new boy is aware of is that terrible thump in his chest, and he’s intimidated by their attitude and their confidence. What he doesn’t realize is that they look at him and they see the same thing in him as he sees in them, because by an exercise of discipline he also puts on a superficial appearance of confidence…We go on now into the ring. Half the time they’re walking when they go down to the ring as though they’re going to the gallows. So when they climb those stairs, I never call a fighter yellow. Knowing what he goes through, the very act of climbing into that ring stamps him a person of courage and discipline.” [Heller, 67]

“So now they get into the ring…The other guy probably looks bigger, and stronger and better conditioned and real muscular and when he start to loosen up he looks more experienced. This is the novice fighter’s mind and imagination exaggerating everything, which is what the mind does. Nothing is ever as bad as the imagination makes it, not even death. A person doesn’t realize what’s making him nervous unless he understands why he’s getting scared, which is the natural, normal thing. When he understands it he accepts it as such. Then it doesn’t become as intimidating, which is the reason why I take the boy step by step until actually the bell rings to fight. I take them that way so that hopefully by the time they get to fight they’ve experienced these different feelings which are often intimidating by themselves. “Cus said it was going to be like this,” so that they don’t feel they are inferior or less prepared than their opponent.” [Heller, 67]

“Now, when they go in and face the opponent and the bell rings, for the first time…they’re facing reality, and suddenly a relative calmness comes over them. Relative. They’re still scared but it isn’t that terrible intimidating unknown thing….But the moment the blows start to be thrown, the effort to throw punches has begun, he gets calm, because now this is something he’s been prepared to cope with….However, I should add that at no time does fear disappear. It’s just as bad in the hundredth fight as it was in the first, except by the time he reaches a hundred fights or long before that he’s developed enough discipline where he can learn to live with it, which is the object, to learn to live with it…” [Heller, 67]

“Every fighter that ever lived had fear. A boy comes to me and tells me that he’s not afraid, if I believed him I’d say he’s a liar or there’s something wrong with him. I’d send him to a doctor to find out what the hell’s the matter with him, because this is not a normal reaction. The fighter that’s gone into the ring and hasn’t experienced fear is either a liar or a psychopath…” [Heller, 67]

On the importance of will:
“When two men are fighting, what makes you’re watching is more a contest of wills than of skills, with the stronger will usually overcoming skill. The skill will prevail only when it is so superior to the other man’s skill that the will is not tested….
As times as you see a fellow get tired in the course of a fight, note that he gets tired when pressure builds up, after he gets hurt or he’s been in some kind of doubtful situation, not being able to control the situation. That’s when he starts getting tired. That’s why when two good fighters get to fight, they’re head to head, so to speak, they won’t give an inch and they’re using all their skills and ability, until maybe about the seventh or eight or ninth round, one fighter start to visibly weaken. It only means he’s reached a point where he no longer can stand the pressure. He’s now become dominated, because when two people fight it’s very much like two armies. They seek to impose their will on one another.” [Heller, 76]

On how Mike gave him reason to live:
“I often say to Mike, “You know, I owe you a lot,” and he doesn’t know what I mean….If he weren’t here, I probably wouldn’t be alive today….Nature is smarter than people think. Little by little we lose our friends that we care about and little by little we lose our interest until finally we say what the devil am I doing around here if I have no reason to go on? You get used to everything. Even the idea of dying is something a person gets used too, and he accepts it. I believe that people die because they no longer want to live, they have no motivation to stay alive. But I have a reason with Mike here, and he gives me the motivation. I will stay alive and I will watch him become a success, because I will not leave until that happens, because when I leave he not only will know how to fight, he’ll be able to take care of himself. I don’t succeed when I make a guy become Champion of the World. I succeed when I make that fellow become Champion of the World and independent of me…” [Heller, 86]

On being a professional:
“I believe a man is a professional when he can do what needs to be done no matter how he feels within. An amateur is an amateur in his attitude emotionally. A professional is an professional in the way he thinks and feels and in his ability to execute inder the most trying conditions. The ability to do what needs to be done regardless of the pressure and do it with poise, with no reflection of his inner feeling or conflict if it exists, is what makes a professional. It has nothing to do with their knowledge. I’ll show you many amateurs with far superior knowledge and ability than top professionals.” [Heller, 97]

“When you get hit that’s when you’ve got to be calm. A professional fighter has to learn how to hit and not get hit, and at the same time be exciting. That’s what professional boxing is about. You’ve got to be clever, you’ve got to be smart, and not get hit, and when you’re able to do this, you’re a fighter.” [Heller, 97]

“If you can hit your opponent with two punches, you don’t hit him with one. Get off with some bad intentions in there. Believe in yourself. A guy can feel it if you don’t believe in yourself. Set your mind to make yourself do it.” [Heller, 97]

On the hero and the coward:
“I tell my kids, what is the difference between a hero and a coward? What is the difference between being yellow and being brave? No difference. Only what you do. They both feel the same. They both fear dying and getting hurt. The man who is yellow refuses to face up to what he’s got to face. The hero is more disciplined and he fights those feelings off and he does what he has to do. But they both feel the same, the hero and the coward. People who watch you judge you on what you do, not how you fee.” [Heller, 97]

On Mike’s progress in the short time:
“The boy can do everything a champion is required to do, and if he does everything that he’s capable of doing, I tell you he may go down as one of the greatest fighters of all time…as a professional my judgment of a fighter are detached. I never allow my personal feelings to get involved, no matter how much affection I may have for him, and I can honestly say I have a very deep affection for him, and an admiration, having watched him come from where he was to what he is, because I know what it takes to do what he’s done and what he’s doing. I feel I was a part of it. It’s almost like watching yourself. You never know how much you contributed to it, but the result is there and you like to think you had something to do with it.” [Heller, 98]

On his dream of a heavyweight champion at the top:
“Many people who have been around boxing all those years never had a champion, certainly a heavyweight champion….For that to happen in one’s lifetime is so improbable. I got Floyd Patterson, then, here, at the age of 76, I was fortunate to come in contact with this young man who has, in my opinion, all the requirements to be a champion that I believe he’s going to be, maybe the best that ever lived.” [Heller, 110]

“Boxing is a contest of character and ingenuity. The boxer with more will, determination, desire, and intelligence is always the one who comes out the victor.” [Fire, 36].

Talking to the thirteen year old Mike about fear:
“Boxing is a sport of self-control. You must understand fear so you can manipulate it. Fear is like fire. You can make it work for you: it can warm you in the winter, cook your food when you’re hungry, give you light when you are in the dark, and produce energy. Let it go out of control and it can hurt you, even kill you….Fear is a friend of exceptional people.” [Fire 50]

Categories
Uncategorized

Kevin Rooney interview: Talkin’ Mike Tyson with Kevin Rooney

Source: boxinginsider.com

Author: Scoop Malinowski

Date: 1 august 2011

It’s always a pleasure to listen to Kevin Rooney talk about his old charge Mike Tyson, who in his prime years in the 1980′s, was the most exciting, destructive heavyweight force in boxing history. Check this out…

BoxingInsider: When was Mike at his prime best?

Kevin Rooney: ”When he beat Michael Spinks. He just wiped him out. Before that he beat Tony Tucker and Tyrell Biggs, the main fighters back then. He wiped out Tony Tucker – he won a 12 round decision, I mean, he kicked his ass. Then he knocked out Tyrell Biggs. He knocked out Larry Holmes. Then he fought Tony Tubbs in Japan – he starched him in two rounds. Then he knocked out Michael Spinks in 90 seconds. 90 seconds. It wasn’t a joke. I mean, he knocked him out. So I think that fighter, in my opinion, could have and should have probably beaten anybody that was in his path. Anybody including Rocky Marciano and Muhammad Ali. Well, I’ll give Muhammad Ali and Rocky – well it could have been different, I mean, Rocky punched like hell. Muhammad punched like hell. Rocky had beat everyone. Muhammad had heart and was hard to hit. The fights would have been interesting. But I believe that Mike would have come out the better. Because he punched very hard [laughs]. Mike…I believe that Mike is one of the hardest punchers in history. He punches harder than Rocky. Punches harder than Joe Louis. Punches harder than George Foreman.”

BoxingInsider: Didn’t sparring guys come to the gym, see Mike punch, then leave the gym?

Kevin Rooney: ”I don’t remember the guy’s name. I believe he was being paid $400 a week. This was in the early 80′s. The guy gets into the ring [laughs]. Bell rings, Mike comes out, bop, bop, bop. Mike throws combinations. He put his hands up, like, Hold it. He steps out of the ring over the top rope – he was big, like 6-4, 6-5 – and walks out of the front door. Didn’t look for his pay, just gone. We’re all like, what’s happening?! He wanted nothing to do with Mike. He just left. It was funny. Cus (D’Amato), Bill (Cayton), Jim (Jacobs) and Steve (Lott) would bring in a lot of fighters, just do one round. James Broad was a tough guy. There was a guy who would stay in there and give Mike the work, but then took a beating. I mean, every day they took a beating every day. That’s the way Mike was. He was strong, determined, and he wanted to hurt you.”

BoxingInsider: When do you believe Ali was at his prime and what would your strategy be for Mike vs. Ali?

Kevin Rooney: ”1966, 67, 68, in that time frame. After he beat Liston he just started annihilating guys that were going for the title. Knockin’ people out cold in tough fights, guys that weren’t pushovers. Muhammad dominated. The Muhammad Ali in 1966-67 and Mike Tyson in 1986-87-88-89 – that would have been an incredible fight. I think Mike would have won. He punched harder than Muhammad. But at that point, Muhammad would have had just a little bit more experience. Mike punched hard. Mike really, really punched hard. You’re talking about a kid, 20, 21, 22, against Ali who was 23, 24. It would have been a helluva fight. I would want Mike to put tremendous pressure on him. Cut him off. Get him on the ropes. Wing body shots and the uppercuts. Step to the side and if you got lucky enough, hit him with the right hand or left hook and he would be gone. But see, Muhammad was a great, great fighter. We call him the greatest fighter ever, he took a helluva shot. He never dogged it, he never quit. But the Mike Tyson that I was training – coming off of Cus D’Amato – I just think that that Mike Tyson would have won. Because he punched fast and hard. That’s a difficult combination to deal with. A guy that punches fast and hard, you got a guy that punches hard, well you’re a tough guy all right, well, so what? But when you got a kid that punches hard AND fast. Then all the sudden you’re like, who, who, damn, wait a minute. Right away your hands are gonna go up. You’re gonna be on the move. You’re gonna do this and you’re gonna wanna do that. You’re not gonna stand there and say, hit me again. So Mike had that.”

BoxingInsider: What Tyson fight were you most concerned with going in?

Kevin Rooney: ”None. None. When I had Mike we were in training camp for five weeks. Back then I used to run 3-4 miles with him just to make sure he was doing it. And then we’d go to the gym. And then we’d go to a health club at night. Then we’d go do bed. When he was with me there was no partying. There was no, well I worked hard, I’m gonna go have a few drinks and try to pick up a girl. That never happened. Hey Mike, guess what? We got a title to defend and you gotta be in tip-top shape. So that Mike Tyson, if he didn’t cross channels and went with Don King, he would have gone down as the greatest heavyweight in history. Now people are talking, ah, he’s nothing. But that’s not true.”

BoxingInsider: Is he at his best the greatest fighting machine of the ring you ever saw?

Kevin Rooney: ”Yes. I believe that and I stand by that. He was. Because he was elusive. The best thing about it was these guys couldn’t hit him. When you can’t hit somebody, that becomes very frustrating. In boxing, I’m trying to hit you, you’re moving your head and I can’t hit you. And I’m like, what the ****. That’s what happened in a lot of Mike’s fights. They couldn’t hit him. And I could see then, Mike, this guy’s ready to go, get rid of him. He don’t want to hang around no more. And why? Because I could see the frustration in their face. They throw punches and they can’t hit him. Wait. When I throw these punches against Tom Dick I hit him. I throw ‘em against this guy, I can’t hit him [smiles]. That was Cus’ style. Mike could have been 100-0 and made a billion dollars, if he stayed with me.”

Scoop Malinowski is the author of “Heavyweight Armageddon: The Tyson-Lewis Championship Battle.” His second book is about controversial former ATP #1 tennis player “Marcelo Rios: The Man We Barely Knew” and will be available at www.amazon.com in September 2011.

Categories
Uncategorized

Mike Tyson’s roadwork?

MessageAuthor
Posted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 4:24 am   Anybody know how far and how long Mike used to run?  Kidynamite

Training

Joined: Dec 10, 2009
Posts: 3
Location: Australia

TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
 Ad
       
Stay connected to us – and get so much more – with the TysonTalk Community Toolbar!    
 
Posted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 2:51 pm   35 miles under 30 minutes  shawntyson

Olympics

Joined: Jun 24, 2008
Posts: 122


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 2:55 pm   Mike used to run 4-5 miles, which took him about 35-45 minutes. He used to go for a run at very early morning, at 3-4 am.  Rhino_

Training

Joined: Jan 08, 2008
Posts: 17


TTBO record:
3-2 ; 1 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

 
 
Posted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 6:56 pm   shawntyson wrote: 35 miles under 30 minutes

What are you on about 35 miles? Idiot..  
Kidynamite

Training

Joined: Dec 10, 2009
Posts: 3
Location: Australia

TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 9:09 pm   Kidynamite wrote: shawntyson wrote: 35 miles under 30 minutes

What are you on about 35 miles? Idiot..

Idiot?

Such quick insults for someone who seeks knowledge.

Why are you here?

Sorry to leave out the –

SIR…

maybe for a purpose, maybe not.

Read, learn, take the time out to learn about Mike Tyson, like many have here.

You seek quick answers, but are not worthy….yet

Stick around,

and learn…Kid….

Steve Lott comes around these parts ,

to School them Idiots..

like many others  
shawntyson

Olympics

Joined: Jun 24, 2008
Posts: 122


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 12:13 am   shawntyson wrote: Kidynamite wrote: shawntyson wrote: 35 miles under 30 minutes

What are you on about 35 miles? Idiot..

Idiot?

Such quick insults for someone who seeks knowledge.

Why are you here?

Sorry to leave out the –

SIR…

maybe for a purpose, maybe not.

Read, learn, take the time out to learn about Mike Tyson, like many have here.

You seek quick answers, but are not worthy….yet

Stick around,

and learn…Kid….

Steve Lott comes around these parts ,

to School them Idiots..

like many others

Lol what a retard. Thanks for the tips mate but how about next time you research your answer before posting yeh? You took the time out to learn about Mike right? So then why did u write his roadwork was 35 miles? Maybe you’re the one who needs to ‘stick around and learn’. Hypocrite..  
Kidynamite

Training

Joined: Dec 10, 2009
Posts: 3
Location: Australia

TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 11:31 am   Kidynamite wrote: shawntyson wrote: Kidynamite wrote: shawntyson wrote: 35 miles under 30 minutes

What are you on about 35 miles? Idiot..

Idiot?

Such quick insults for someone who seeks knowledge.

Why are you here?

Sorry to leave out the –

SIR…

maybe for a purpose, maybe not.

Read, learn, take the time out to learn about Mike Tyson, like many have here.

You seek quick answers, but are not worthy….yet

Stick around,

and learn…Kid….

Steve Lott comes around these parts ,

to School them Idiots..

like many others

Lol what a retard. Thanks for the tips mate but how about next time you research your answer before posting yeh? You took the time out to learn about Mike right? So then why did u write his roadwork was 35 miles? Maybe you’re the one who needs to ‘stick around and learn’. Hypocrite..

It was meant to say 3-5 miles you moron, as Ive already explained. I left out the little – like I said you jacka ss! Or maybe I left it out to be funny, as what dumba ss would believe Mike ran 35 miles under 30 minutes, maybe someone who is 12, or someone who thinks Tyson does 10000 pushups in 30 minutes.

Are you 12 yet..matey?  
shawntyson

Olympics

Joined: Jun 24, 2008
Posts: 122


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 11:49 am   Rhino_ wrote: Mike used to run 4-5 miles, which took him about 35-45 minutes. He used to go for a run at very early morning, at 3-4 am.

I dont agree Rhino, as 4 to 5 miles in 35 to 45 minutes is running real slow.

Lets do the math..

If he were to run 4 miles in 35 minutes thats like 8 to 9 minutes a mile, as 4 times 8 is 32, and 4 times 9 is 36, so thats running real slow man. Tommy Morrison weighed heavier then Mike, and his trainer Tommy Virgets had him running 6 minute miles, which Im sure is around the same pace as Mike, as I doubt Tommy could run faster then Mike.

So if he were to run at the 6 minute mile pace, and go all out to 5 miles, it would be 30 minutes flat. Rooney said Cus always had the mandatory of 30 minutes of running in the morning and 10 rounds of boxing, which Im sure Mike did more in the boxing department.

And I think the earliest Mike ran was 4am, as 3am sounds a little off, lol.  
shawntyson

Olympics

Joined: Jun 24, 2008
Posts: 122


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 2:12 pm   shawntyson wrote: Rhino_ wrote: Mike used to run 4-5 miles, which took him about 35-45 minutes. He used to go for a run at very early morning, at 3-4 am.

I dont agree Rhino, as 4 to 5 miles in 35 to 45 minutes is running real slow.

Lets do the math..



Thank you for correcting my mistakes, my calculation was wrong. I have read so many interviews and articles about Tyson’s training, but I never knew that Cus made him run for 30 minutes, thank you for that also.

Yeah, maybe 4-5 AM is closer to the truth.  
Rhino_

Training

Joined: Jan 08, 2008
Posts: 17


TTBO record:
3-2 ; 1 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

 
 
Posted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 3:27 pm   Rhino_ wrote: shawntyson wrote: Rhino_ wrote: Mike used to run 4-5 miles, which took him about 35-45 minutes. He used to go for a run at very early morning, at 3-4 am.

I dont agree Rhino, as 4 to 5 miles in 35 to 45 minutes is running real slow.

Lets do the math..



Thank you for correcting my mistakes, my calculation was wrong. I have read so many interviews and articles about Tyson’s training, but I never knew that Cus made him run for 30 minutes, thank you for that also.

Yeah, maybe 4-5 AM is closer to the truth.

Yeah theres so many interviews it is hard to know the truth these days. I was so glad when I found that Rooney interview, (probably through here) where he talks about the daily regimen Cus’s fighters followed.

Maybe someone could post it?

Steve Lott also talks about Mikes training methods as well here, but too bad he doesnt come around here anymore. As I know some here would like to pick at his brain, including myself. But he got upset over the Tyson film and left, too bad for some of us 

Anyway, I wasnt trying to publicly “correct” you Rhino, I just wanted to make sure Mr. KiddyDynamite got the right info, as I didnt want him to leave here empty handed thinking Mike Tyson ran 50 miles per hour!   
shawntyson

Olympics

Joined: Jun 24, 2008
Posts: 122


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 5:53 pm   Well, you can try to contact Mr.Lott at his e-mail at BIGFIGHTS@aol.com
I asked him about Mike’s training awhile back and he answered.
I hope that someone would send him an e-mail and ask him about the amount of reps that Mike did in sit-ups and push ups etc.  
Rhino_

Training

Joined: Jan 08, 2008
Posts: 17


TTBO record:
3-2 ; 1 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

 
 
Posted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 10:20 pm   Rhino_ wrote: Well, you can try to contact Mr.Lott at his e-mail at BIGFIGHTS@aol.com
I asked him about Mike’s training awhile back and he answered.
I hope that someone would send him an e-mail and ask him about the amount of reps that Mike did in sit-ups and push ups etc.

I emailed Steve before trying to get some specifics on Mikes diet. But I dont now if he understands though, or maybe too busy which I respect, how intrigued some are here about Mikes daily routine, from sun-up to sun-down back in the prime years. Kinda like a day, or preferably a week with Mike Tyson. He was pretty vague about his diet, saying Mike ate anything. But I know Steve used to cook for Mike, so I asked how he made him his pasta, as in a special healthy low fat way, that kinda small stuff. He didnt respond, lol. Its cool though, as Steve answered so many questions here in alot detail and I respect that.

But some fanatics here wanna know if Mike used butter on his toast, or margarine, or mustard or mayo on his dang sandwich, lol, tiny specifics like that. I know Rooney must have monitered Mike all the time in those days, and was vocal to Mike what he can and cant eat and do. The little things, in his training for sure as well, as in exactly how many pushups, etc, etc. The younger guys may wanna know these things, who are, or wanna be fighters themselves, and want to try and emulate Mike down to the T with what he did back then when he was at his best.
Im not saying they will be like him, but it cant hurt to try the way I see it, and it may motivate them even more knowing exactly how Tyson lived a typical day back then.  
shawntyson

Olympics

Joined: Jun 24, 2008
Posts: 122


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Sun Dec 13, 2009 11:02 am   Tysons diet wasent anything special he ate what most fighters do…lots of meat, pasta, potatoes, oats, fish, protein powder supplement. some cheat meals here and there… you must remember that the biggest reason Tyson looked and performed the way he did was because of 1. Genetics 2. Training 3. Work ethic
_________________
“March 18th Mike Tyson Razor Ruddock, Razor Ruddock dies! iIf he doesn’t die it doesn’t count” 
demorak

World Champion

Joined: Jun 18, 2005
Posts: 351


TTBO record:
5-6 ; 4 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

 
 
Posted: Sun Dec 13, 2009 3:37 pm   demorak wrote: Tysons diet wasent anything special he ate what most fighters do…lots of meat, pasta, potatoes, oats, fish, protein powder supplement. some cheat meals here and there… you must remember that the biggest reason Tyson looked and performed the way he did was because of 1. Genetics 2. Training 3. Work ethic


Yeah I know this, now, but like 15 years ago, mannn.. I was obsessed with the small details of certain athletes, especially Mike, as thats whatcha do when your a kid with a dream. You just wanna…”Be like Mike” in every way , lol!

I remember back then I used to scower through some of the books written then, not really wanting to hear of the girls and all that crap, just the training and diet stuff!  
shawntyson

Olympics

Joined: Jun 24, 2008
Posts: 122


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Wed Dec 16, 2009 12:41 pm   shawntyson wrote: Rhino_ wrote: shawntyson wrote: Rhino_ wrote: Mike used to run 4-5 miles, which took him about 35-45 minutes. He used to go for a run at very early morning, at 3-4 am.

I dont agree Rhino, as 4 to 5 miles in 35 to 45 minutes is running real slow.

Lets do the math..



Thank you for correcting my mistakes, my calculation was wrong. I have read so many interviews and articles about Tyson’s training, but I never knew that Cus made him run for 30 minutes, thank you for that also.

Yeah, maybe 4-5 AM is closer to the truth.

Yeah theres so many interviews it is hard to know the truth these days. I was so glad when I found that Rooney interview, (probably through here) where he talks about the daily regimen Cus’s fighters followed.

Maybe someone could post it?

Steve Lott also talks about Mikes training methods as well here, but too bad he doesnt come around here anymore. As I know some here would like to pick at his brain, including myself. But he got upset over the Tyson film and left, too bad for some of us 

Anyway, I wasnt trying to publicly “correct” you Rhino, I just wanted to make sure Mr. KiddyDynamite got the right info, as I didnt want him to leave here empty handed thinking Mike Tyson ran 50 miles per hour! 

i was just wonderign why steve lott got upset over tyson movie ?  
ste-wolves

Training

Joined: Nov 21, 2009
Posts: 24


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
  
Categories
Uncategorized

About Tyson lifting weights in his prime…

MessageAuthor
Posted: Wed Jul 22, 2009 5:48 am   I saw a post from somebody that said that Mike Tyson never lifted weights during his prime. Well it is hard for me to believe that a 220 pound man build of solid muscles build up his body by only lifting his own body weight. I train both boxing and weight lifting. I had trained boxing for 3 years and i wasn’t getting any heavier but when I started in powerlifting (squats and bench press) I put on 20 pounds of muscles in only half a year( I was only 95 pounds before i started weight lifting). But weight lifting didn’t make me slower it just made my punches much harder and increased the endurance in my legs! I think Tyson probably had like 3 or 4 weight lifting sessions a week. But If you guys have any proof that Tyson didn’t lift weights in his prime I would be happy to see it.  Eggert

Training

Joined: Aug 02, 2008
Posts: 4


TTBO record:
39-19 ; 22 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

 
 
 Ad
       
Stay connected to us – and get so much more – with the TysonTalk Community Toolbar!    
 
Posted: Wed Jul 22, 2009 4:09 pm   I don’t think Tyson BUILD his muscle. He probably had almost the same type of body before he trained. He just became very ripped after he started training very hard. I mean there is such a clear diffirence in his physique between the 80s and later on in his career.

This can be achieved by a man just doing Boxing workouts extensively, but with the best genetics someone can have.


This definitely looks more impressive. He was lifting weights by then.

_________________

My videos in here:
http://www.tysontalk.com/ttvideo-cat-4.html 
Turk15

World Champion

Joined: Jan 08, 2006
Posts: 512


TTBO record:
86-33 ; 49 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

  
 
Posted: Wed Jul 22, 2009 4:09 pm   mike may of used weights, to build up the biceps and i think he went on record in saying he used weights to build up his trapezius’. mike almost certainly adopted plyometrics into his work outs which is as effective as weight training but more effective for speed and endurance. . . but its very hard to adopt weights into boxing and keep the lightening speed, what mike had. alot of guys use weights and some to good effect depending on their style, holyfield used it well and so too did frank bruno. but mikes style was so heavily dependent on speed, weights would definatly have been a set back, like it was to roy jones james toney and to some degree tysons come back in the 90’s. . . with no disrespect to you, mike was a genetic monster. . . not many people can look like him, despite his work out techniques. . but on the other side of the coin people can train as hard as its physically possible and still never attain a physique anywhere close to him.

personally i think mike looked bigger and better before he started weight training then he did when using weights.  
ashman99

Training

Joined: Jul 30, 2004
Posts: 23


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Wed Jul 22, 2009 6:02 pm   ashman99 wrote:
personally i think mike looked bigger and better before he started weight training then he did when using weights.

Better yes. But he was lighter in his prime.
_________________

My videos in here:
http://www.tysontalk.com/ttvideo-cat-4.html 
Turk15

World Champion

Joined: Jan 08, 2006
Posts: 512


TTBO record:
86-33 ; 49 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

  
 
Posted: Wed Jul 22, 2009 7:46 pm   Mike Tyson looked more muscular when he was 30 years old than when he was 20 because it is proved that you’re body is the most muscular when you’re 30 years old  Eggert

Training

Joined: Aug 02, 2008
Posts: 4


TTBO record:
39-19 ; 22 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

 
 
Posted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 11:35 am   ok any one that thinks mike did not lift waieghts is an absolute idiat my lifting coach evan gave me tapes of his work out he did mostly back, shoulders, and legs, but he liftid ,,,,a lot in his prim evan at the begging he liftid ,,,,,,you doet hit that hard with out lifting yes mike was always a big dude but he was’nt that big since 12 trust me he liftid,,

jim3 out,,,,
_________________
www.benardhopkins.net
www.thesweetscience.com
www.minnasotaboxing.com
www.mageshack.us
gildenboyboxing.com
www.smashdown.com
www.nekoosaboxing.come
www.amazon.com
www.tysontalk.com
www.wisconsinboxing.com/home
www.maherauto.com 
jim3

World Champion

Joined: May 06, 2008
Posts: 800


TTBO record:
281-145 ; 137 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

    
 
Posted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 1:56 pm   Turk15 wrote: ashman99 wrote:
personally i think mike looked bigger and better before he started weight training then he did when using weights.

Better yes. But he was lighter in his prime.

im talking about his prime 85-89 he looked bigger and better (imo).
he was actually fighting arround the 218 mark even after prison against mcneely, bruno, and holyfields fights he was weighing 218 – 220.  
ashman99

Training

Joined: Jul 30, 2004
Posts: 23


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 10:12 am   Tysons body looks disgusting in that weigh in picture with mckneeley. That was after prison as everyone knows, he must of done a ton of lifting in prison, he looks like he just focused on power after prison, or even after rooney was fired, but mike weighed 190 lbs when he was 12, he did have good genetics but muscles don’t just appear, and sparring/running/bag training doesn’t build large muscels(which mike always had) like jim said ur a fool to think he never weight trained even at the age of 14-15. He didn’t just deadlift and bench, he did special work outs to improve every aspect of his power, but yes he was an true believer in running, and sparring(5 days a week) but that improves endurance, speed, and technique, not power.  ComeBaKid

Training

Joined: Jul 12, 2009
Posts: 26


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 10:41 am   ComeBaKid wrote: Tysons body looks disgusting in that weigh in picture with mckneeley. That was after prison as everyone knows, he must of done a ton of lifting in prison, he looks like he just focused on power after prison, or even after rooney was fired, but mike weighed 190 lbs when he was 12, he did have good genetics but muscles don’t just appear, and sparring/running/bag training doesn’t build large muscels(which mike always had) like jim said ur a fool to think he never weight trained even at the age of 14-15. He didn’t just deadlift and bench, he did special work outs to improve every aspect of his power, but yes he was an true believer in running, and sparring(5 days a week) but that improves endurance, speed, and technique, not power. yeha on be hinf the gloly of mike tyson the talk to the prison gard he said at late hours mike would do puch ups and pull ups shadow box in his cell,,
_________________
www.benardhopkins.net
www.thesweetscience.com
www.minnasotaboxing.com
www.mageshack.us
gildenboyboxing.com
www.smashdown.com
www.nekoosaboxing.come
www.amazon.com
www.tysontalk.com
www.wisconsinboxing.com/home
www.maherauto.com 
jim3

World Champion

Joined: May 06, 2008
Posts: 800


TTBO record:
281-145 ; 137 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

    
 
Posted: Sun Jul 26, 2009 3:08 pm   jim3 wrote: ok any one that thinks mike did not lift waieghts is an absolute idiat my lifting coach evan gave me tapes of his work out he did mostly back, shoulders, and legs, but he liftid ,,,,a lot in his prim evan at the begging he liftid ,,,,,,you doet hit that hard with out lifting yes mike was always a big dude but he was’nt that big since 12 trust me he liftid,,

jim3 out,,,,

can you post these videos of mike training weights for his back shoulders and legs?

ComeBaKid wrote: Tysons body looks disgusting in that weigh in picture with mckneeley. That was after prison as everyone knows, he must of done a ton of lifting in prison, he looks like he just focused on power after prison, or even after rooney was fired, but mike weighed 190 lbs when he was 12, he did have good genetics but muscles don’t just appear, and sparring/running/bag training doesn’t build large muscels(which mike always had) like jim said ur a fool to think he never weight trained even at the age of 14-15. He didn’t just deadlift and bench, he did special work outs to improve every aspect of his power, but yes he was an true believer in running, and sparring(5 days a week) but that improves endurance, speed, and technique, not power.

bag training does infact build large muscles.. particularly in the back and arms, rocky marcianno is quoted on saying he gained a solid 20lbs from hitting the heavy bag alone. i seriously doubt weight training was high on mikes coaching staff’s agenda, as back in the 80’s people werent fundamentally aware of the benefits of weight training in sports like football basket ball and especially boxing. i think alot of you are ignorant about disregarding how much explosive power and speed can be gained from body weight exercises especially PLYOMETRICS which im sure mike did daily!

jim3 wrote: yeha on be hinf the gloly of mike tyson the talk to the prison gard he said at late hours mike would do puch ups and pull ups shadow box in his cell,,

push ups pull ups and shadow boxing isnt weight training.


ill share this article i found years ago, i believe it to be from a very reliable source.


Quote: The boxers training regime
Iron Mike Tyson (in the 1980’s)

Up until he fired Kevin Rooney in 1988, his ONLY diet was steak, pasta and fruit juice. How’s that for discipline?

Daily Regime (7 days a week):

5am: get up and go for a 3 mile jog
6am: come back home shower and go back to bed (great workout for those huge legs of his) 10am wake up: eat oatmeal
12pm: do ring work (10 rounds of sparring)
2pm: have another meal (steak and pasta with fruit juice drink)
3pm: more ring work and 60 mins on the exercise bike (again working those huge legs for endurance)
5pm: 2000 sit-ups; 500-800 dips; 500 press-ups; 500 shrugs with a 30kg barbell and 10 mins of neck exercises
7pm: steak and pasta meal again with fruit juice (orange i think it was)
8pm: another 30 minutes on the exercise bike then watch TV and then go to bed.

(Before jogging in the morning he did a lot of stretching followed by 10 jumps onto boxes and 10 bursts of sprints, then he went jogging.
At 12pm he sparred.
At 3pm he did focus mitt work or heavy bag work inside the ring. He warmed up for all ring work with light exercises such as skipping or shadow boxing or speed ball.
At 5pm Tyson did 10 quick circuits, each circuit consisting of: 200 sit-ups, then 25-40 dips, then 50 press-ups, then 25-40 dips, then 50 shrugs, followed by 10 mins of neck work on the floor. Tyson said that the shrugs “built his shoulders up” to help unleash punches with his short arms whilst at the same time building endurance in the neck.

It should be noted though that Tyson couldn’t do any more than 50 sit-ups a day and 50 press-ups a day when he was 13, but gradually increasing the reps each week got him to a higher level over many years, so that he was doing 2000 sit-ups inside 2 hours every day by the time he was 20.) Mike told Ian Durke (Sky commentator) his above workout regime when he visited England to watch a Frank Bruno fight in March 1987. Durke told Mike that Bruno trained like a bodybuilder and asked Mike about this, but Mike said that floor exercises and natural exercises work better. Mike explained that his punch-power comes from nothing more than heavy bag work “works your strength through the hips” he said, despite doing shrugs with a barbell he said that lifting weights has about as much resemblance to punching as “cheesecake” (contradicting himself though due to doing shrugs).

But his mentor Cus D’Amato realised that, due to Tyson’s style, he needed punch-power (not that he didn’t have it naturally anyway). So Cus got Mike very heavy bags to hit for a 13 yr old, and Cus gradually increased the weight of the bags Tyson used over time so that by the age of 18-19 Tyson was banging bags that no other man could budge! Also, Cus used to order Tyson to go jog 3 miles with 50lbs on his back because he didn’t want Mike growing any taller (because it didn’t suit his style)! Mike Tyson (as of March 1987) Monday to Friday: Go for a 3 mile run in the morning. Do mid-day ring-work (10 rounds of sparring). Do evening ring-work (focus mitts and/or heavy bag). Warm-up for all ring-work with shadow boxing. Following mid-day ring-work – work on the slip bags and/or speed bags. Following evening ring-work – do circuits of bodyweight exercises (sit-ups, push-ups, pull-ups, dips) followed by 10 mins of neck work on the floor and 10 mins of skipping. (apparently every six months the size of the heavy bag was increased and the size of the speed bag was decreased).  
ashman99

Training

Joined: Jul 30, 2004
Posts: 23


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Tue Jul 28, 2009 5:09 pm   i personally dont think mike lifted weights…or if he did it was so small of a thing that it didn’t matter…he did bodyweight exercises and for anyone who says you can’t get big off of bodyweight exercises hasn’t been doing them right…sure he probably did something for his biceps and maybe even his traps but you have to remember that when they found him at 12 he already weighed was most of us do as adults…it would have been nothing to put on 20-30 pounds of muscle by the time he was 20…now if i found out he did lift weights back then, i wouldn’t be suprised but i don’t believe he did…i mean think about it..tyson has more footage and interviews on him than any other boxer except maybe ali…don’t you think someone would have seen or said somethings all these years about whether he did or not…if everyone knows that berbick,bruno holyfield,jones,toney,etc.. lifted then it would have gotten out that tyson did as well  kdynamite

Amateur

Joined: Apr 07, 2007
Posts: 63


TTBO record:
3-1 ; 3 KOs
TTBO rank:
INACTIVE AMATEUR

 
 
Posted: Tue Jul 28, 2009 10:29 pm   Tyson had great genetics, plain and simple, along with alot of African Americans I used to play sports with back in the late 80s and early 90s a couple hours outside catskill where i grew up. they barely touched a weight, and followed a diet of ding dongs washed down with grape drink, and still were built like holy helll, and stronger and faster too. man i was jealous, haha. GENETICS is what its called..combined with a will like Mikes, your on your way. Hershel Walker was also huge like Mike, before he touched a weight also

All Tyson had to do was train hard boxing workouts, and eat alot good heavy meat and pasta diet, as Kevin Rooney said he used to pound down the chicken and steaks as he was always loading the freezer with them. maybe he did a couple curls and shrugs in his 80s prime, but thats surely not a “regular” weightlifting routine that football players and the like follow.

I actually know when Tyson start incorporating more weights in his training, as if you watch his early fights, he gets more of the bodybuilding looking and tad bit slower too, then the previous fights. im gonna go back and look, as im watching the Ferguson fight now.

ILL BE BACK   
shawntyson

Olympics

Joined: Jun 24, 2008
Posts: 122


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Mon Aug 17, 2009 4:02 pm   I agree with shawntyson. It is all in the genetics. Tyson had the same shape at age 11, solid muscle. Lifting weights only gives the appearance of athleticism, but true elite athletes like Tyson are born to be that way.  tata1

Training

Joined: Aug 17, 2009
Posts: 3


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Tue Aug 18, 2009 7:47 pm   I too think tyson looked bigger and more solid pre prison. Even though his fighting weight was pretty much the same post prison he just looked a lot smaller. His body began to resemble that of a bodybuilder, his shoulder, back and neck muscles seemed to have deteriorated somewhat whilst in prison making him look a little more heavier round the mid section. It was good to see him regain his classic physeek for the Holfield rematch though, just a shame he wasn’t able to put it to good use. I just wish he’d stayed with Kevin Rooney…. the Tyson/Holyfield fight should have been the biggest, most significant fight in boxing history, instead we got a burnt out mike tyson who at 30yo should have been at his peak.  mot

Training

Joined: Jun 15, 2008
Posts: 5


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Wed Aug 19, 2009 11:00 am   The proof is in the pudding (or pictures)… Tyson early ’80s was not ripped. Extremely fast punches, upper body movement.

Tyson post prison was ripped, and his punches slowed down. And it’s a fact that Tyson did do weights while in prison.

So in conclusion, weights don’t do much other than intimidate your opponent, and give you the strength outside of boxing to go lift a refrigerator or something.

Almost ties in with the steroids argument…bigger muscles don’t really help you in boxing. It’s all about generating power from technique and skills.  
addiwei

Training

Joined: Jul 09, 2006
Posts: 5


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 

Check out the online HTML CheatSheet here and save the link because you might need it while composing content for a web page.

Categories
Uncategorized

Mike Tyson vs. Larry Sims – Does This Fight Footage Exist

MessageAuthor
Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2007 8:29 pm   Does anyone have or has anyone seen VIDEO! footage of Mike Tyson vs. Larry Sims, this was Tyson’s 6th pro fight and I cant find it at all so I’m starting to think that it wasn’t recorded, I have two Tyson collections – a 12 disc one & an 8 disc one, both are missing 2 fights “Larry Sims” & “Conroy Nelson”, I’m currently downloading the Conroy Nelson fight but I don’t know if this footage exists ?, will find out soon. the 8 disc collection from www.mike-tyson.info claimed to have the Conroy Nelson Fight but it doesn’t. (I hate when FIGHTER collections are called full careers, if 1 or more fights is missing then it is not a full career!)

(Question in short)
does footage of Tyson vs. Larry Sims exist ?

also does anyone have the 26 dvd collection from www.tysoncollection.com it claims to have the Conroy Nelson Fight as well  
swboxing

Training

Joined: Nov 08, 2007
Posts: 2


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
 Ad
       
Stay connected to us – and get so much more – with the TysonTalk Community Toolbar!    
 
Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2007 8:39 pm   Conroy Nelson yeah, Larry Sims no.  pete321

World Champion

Joined: Feb 26, 2006
Posts: 459


TTBO record:
1-0 ; 1 KOs
TTBO rank:
INACTIVE AMATEUR

 
 
Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2007 9:17 pm   just had a look at the Tyson vs. Conroy Nelson download (poor picture Q and I think it’s russian commentary), I have seen this fight before and I think that I even have this fight somewhere with better pic Q. shame about the Sims fight it would have completed the career but it’s hard to believe that there is no footage of this fight when there is so much footage of Tyson as an amature and even as a 15 year old training in the gym with Cus & Teddy but if it isn’t even on TV e.g. ESPN Classic then I don’t think it exists.  swboxing

Training

Joined: Nov 08, 2007
Posts: 2


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2007 11:00 pm   According to Tyson bios the Simms fight was not recorded. The camera man or people with the cameras did not show up. Maybe someone took home video footage and it might show up some day.  clarkkent

Amateur

Joined: Feb 19, 2006
Posts: 55


TTBO record:
1-0 ; 1 KOs
TTBO rank:
INACTIVE AMATEUR

 
 
Posted: Fri Nov 09, 2007 5:10 pm   No there is no record of it being filmed
_________________

 
Lefthook_mike

Contender

Joined: Feb 08, 2007
Posts: 249


TTBO record:
200-74 ; 129 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

Current streak of title defenses is 0.
Highest streak of title defenses is 1.

 
 
Posted: Sat Nov 10, 2007 1:19 pm   read the steve lott interview on this site
he said the hired cameraman didnt show up and jacobs was furious  
buddymovie

Professional

Joined: Aug 17, 2005
Posts: 181


TTBO record:
33-9 ; 23 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

 
 
Posted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 5:28 am   swboxing wrote: Does anyone have or has anyone seen VIDEO! footage of Mike Tyson vs. Larry Sims, this was Tyson’s 6th pro fight and I cant find it at all so I’m starting to think that it wasn’t recorded, I have two Tyson collections – a 12 disc one & an 8 disc one, both are missing 2 fights “Larry Sims” & “Conroy Nelson”, I’m currently downloading the Conroy Nelson fight but I don’t know if this footage exists ?, will find out soon. the 8 disc collection from www.mike-tyson.info claimed to have the Conroy Nelson Fight but it doesn’t. (I hate when FIGHTER collections are called full careers, if 1 or more fights is missing then it is not a full career!)

(Question in short)
does footage of Tyson vs. Larry Sims exist ?

also does anyone have the 26 dvd collection from www.tysoncollection.com it claims to have the Conroy Nelson Fight as well there is no footage of tyson v simms theres several reason people believe one is the cameraman didnt turn up at the fight two is tysons performance was so bad tysons management destroyed all footage but whatever you believe is up to you but you will not find any footage to this fight anywhere on earth so i would give up looking he won 3rd round ko anyway if you didnt know  
champ7611

Training

Joined: May 24, 2009
Posts: 1


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Sat Jul 04, 2009 6:19 pm   I have the 14-DVD set from Mike-Tyson.dvd.com — which is a really great collection — and it has the Nelson fight. Even YouTube has the fight.  Macrodex

Training

Joined: Jul 04, 2009
Posts: 3


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Sun Jul 12, 2009 9:08 pm   Bill Cayton said all but one of Mike Tyson’s fights were recorded, the Sims fight was the one not recorded.  GivinsMom

Training

Joined: Apr 22, 2009
Posts: 4


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
  
 
Posted: Thu Jul 16, 2009 4:14 pm   I wish it was recorded. I like the full view of what Tyson could do. I laugh at ppl that say they have his full catalog.  cpimp

Professional

Joined: Nov 17, 2004
Posts: 176


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
 
 
Posted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 8:26 am   Yes I asked Steve Lott in that interview and he confirmed it.

This is the closest thing you’ll ever see from the Sims fight
http://media.photobucket.com/image/larry%20sims%20mike%20tyson/Errol100/tysonVsSims.jpg

Looks like a typical early Tyson beat down. His victim scared *Censor*, Tyson goes in for the kill and it’s over.
_________________

My videos in here:
http://www.tysontalk.com/ttvideo-cat-4.html 
Turk15

World Champion

Joined: Jan 08, 2006
Posts: 512


TTBO record:
86-33 ; 49 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

  
Categories
Uncategorized

TOBACK WILL DIRECT NEW TYSON DOCUMENTARY

Director James Toback is in the ring with former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson on a feature documentary.

Toback will prepare “Tyson” using more than 30 hours of recently completed interviews with the ex-champ. The director said his subject pulls no punches in chronicling every aspect of his rise and fall.

Damon Bingham, Harlan Werner, Tyson and Toback are producing. The film will be finished in the fall, and ICM will sell worldwide rights.

Toback told Daily Variety that he’s been fascinated by Tyson since they first met in 1985, just as the fighter was about to win his first title at 19 (he became world champion at 20). He put Tyson in his movies “Black and White” and “When Will I Be Loved,” and they stayed in touch.

After the boxer emerged clean and sober following a recent rehab stint, Tyson and Toback decided it was time to tell his story in detail.

“The point is not to polish his image or make a cinematic apology, but rather to get a firsthand look at a very complex and epic story,” Toback said.

Tyson said he was “humbled and appreciate that Mr. Toback gave me an opportunity to be involved in this project. I will, to the best of my abilities, give a truthful account of myself.”

Categories
Uncategorized

TYSON TRAINING ROUTINE

MessageAuthor
Posted: Tue Dec 12, 2006 6:36 pm   Does anybody know what the REAL Tyson workout consists of?
i got couple sites here that claims to be it but they don’t make any sense

http://community.allhiphop.com/showthread.php?t=241669
(under roy jones)

http://www.saddoboxing.com/boxing_forum/index.php/topic,25812.0.html  
Keunwoo8
 
Training

Joined: Apr 23, 2006
Posts: 23


TTBO record:
1-1 ; 1 KOs
TTBO rank:
INACTIVE AMATEUR

   
 
 Ad
        
  Stay connected to us – and get so much more – with the TysonTalk Community Toolbar!    
 
Posted: Tue Dec 12, 2006 7:58 pm   ummm whats so hard to understand about that? It is clearly broken down in the 1st and 2nd posts on the saddoboxing forum. What did u expect?? 12 hours of military style training 7 days a week?  el_renegado
 
Olympics

Joined: Sep 06, 2005
Posts: 129


TTBO record:
0-1 ; 0 KOs
TTBO rank:
INACTIVE AMATEUR

   
 
Posted: Wed Dec 13, 2006 8:55 am   “Mike Tyson (Back in the day)

Daily Regime (7 days a week):

5am: get up and go for a 3 mile jog

6am: come back home shower and go back to bed (great
workout for those huge legs of his)

10am wake up: eat oatmeal

12pm: do ring work (10 rounds of sparring)

2pm: have another meal (steak and pasta with fruit
juice drink)

3pm: more ring work and 60 mins on the exercise bike
(again working those huge legs for endurance)

5pm: 2000 sit-ups; 500-800 dips; 500 press-ups; 500
shrugs with a 30kg barbell and 10 mins of neck
exercises

7pm: steak and pasta meal again with fruit juice
(orange I think it was)

8pm: another 30 minutes on the exercise bike
then watch TV and then go to bed.

——————————————————————



—-

I made this regime up back in 2003 on www.boxingtime.com/forums and people believed it. I can’t believe it’s still circulating and people still believe it    
CasperUK
 
World Champion

Joined: Jun 12, 2004
Posts: 1221


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
   
 
Posted: Wed Dec 13, 2006 9:08 am   CasperUK wrote: I made this regime up back in 2003 on www.boxingtime.com/forums and people believed it. I can’t believe it’s still circulating and people still believe it  

well, it’s stupid to post hoax  
Nedow
 
Training

Joined: Nov 16, 2006
Posts: 27
Location: Mexico

TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
   
 
Posted: Wed Dec 13, 2006 9:19 am   Nedow wrote: CasperUK wrote: I made this regime up back in 2003 on www.boxingtime.com/forums and people believed it. I can’t believe it’s still circulating and people still believe it  

well, it’s stupid to post hoax

Well its stupid to go against your common sense and believe any old rubbish you see on the internet mate!  
CasperUK
 
World Champion

Joined: Jun 12, 2004
Posts: 1221


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
   
 
Posted: Wed Dec 13, 2006 9:34 am   CasperUK wrote: Well its stupid to go against your common sense and believe any old rubbish you see on the internet mate!

some people even belive, what talking jellybabys say  
Nedow
 
Training

Joined: Nov 16, 2006
Posts: 27
Location: Mexico

TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
   
 
Posted: Wed Dec 13, 2006 12:25 pm   ok so the first link to tysons regime is a fake and the saddo boxing one is real?  Gumuz
 
Olympics

Joined: Feb 10, 2006
Posts: 142


TTBO record:
63-45 ; 31 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

   
 
Posted: Wed Dec 13, 2006 12:53 pm   i found this:


PRIME MIKE TYSON (1986)

Morning Roadwork (Monday to Friday) – 3 miles

Mid-Day Boxing (Monday to Friday) – 10 rounds sparring, 10 mins slip bag, 10 mins speed bag

Afternoon Groundwork (Monday to Friday) – 100 push ups & 100 sit ups x 10 (1000 each in total), 10 mins neck exercises on the floor, 10 mins skipping

Evening Ringwork (only Monday) – practice three-punch combinations on either heavy bags or focus mitts


Before bed, he apparently loved to workout on the stationary bike against full resistance trying to beat PB’s all the time.

For breakfast he’d eat porridge, lunch was steak and pasta (with fruit juice), and dinner was steak and pasta (with fruit juice). Apart from that, he ate his favourite food Captain Crunch by the box load.


(I also know that he only occasionally used the light barbells on the floor in the corner of the Catskill gym to train his biceps, traps and shoulders)


Weekend.. Rest.  
Gumuz
 
Olympics

Joined: Feb 10, 2006
Posts: 142


TTBO record:
63-45 ; 31 KOs
TTBO rank:
RETIRED

   
 
Posted: Thu Dec 24, 2009 1:25 pm   Ive been doing this bit for nigh 3 weeks now and im already turn to get swole.
I do 3 sets of 15 on: Bicep curls, formation plateau, militaristic organization, pet shrugs, forearm curls.

I journeying my bike roughly 2 miles a day and do 4 sets of 50 jumping knucklebones and 1 set of 100 actuation toy at nighttime.

Fasting: 2 packs of oatmeal 4 breakfast and then some i can get 4 the set of the day cuz consumption on a buget u get all kinds of ergodic things. But I achieve certain im being healty. I only steep soda 2wice a week max. And steep the equivelent of 10 or many element bottles a day.

Suplements: Walmarts Strawberry Whey Protien Mix. It tastes pretty unspoiled and it makes my muscles inferior sore cuz it has some kindhearted of deed mix in it 2.

I honourable need to get the most out of excavation out and im sensing 4 any suggestions 2 attain my wourk out statesman telling. But realy im righteous tryin to acquire many around workin out so any advice is understood.
————————————————————–

workout routine  
andrew00
 
Training

Joined: Dec 24, 2009
Posts: 1


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
   
 
Posted: Wed Sep 22, 2010 7:12 am   CasperUK wrote: “Mike Tyson (Back in the day)

Daily Regime (7 days a week):

5am: get up and go for a 3 mile jog

6am: come back home shower and go back to bed (great
workout for those huge legs of his)

10am wake up: eat oatmeal

12pm: do ring work (10 rounds of sparring)

2pm: have another meal (steak and pasta with fruit
juice drink)

3pm: more ring work and 60 mins on the exercise bike
(again working those huge legs for endurance)

5pm: 2000 sit-ups; 500-800 dips; 500 press-ups; 500
shrugs with a 30kg barbell and 10 mins of neck
exercises

7pm: steak and pasta meal again with fruit juice
(orange I think it was)

8pm: another 30 minutes on the exercise bike
then watch TV and then go to bed.

——————————————————————



—-

I made this regime up back in 2003 on www.boxingtime.com/forums and people believed it. I can’t believe it’s still circulating and people still believe it  


I found this thread through a search engine and just wanted to clarify, since others will undoubtedly find it the same way, the twatter who posted this above is more full of shyt than a roadhouse toilet. He didn’t post that routine, it actually was Tyson’s routine back during his prime. Here is a video describing pretty much the exact routine posted.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnwLEbFoBFs  
1stRoundKO
 
Training

Joined: Sep 22, 2010
Posts: 1


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
   
 
Posted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 2:33 pm   As far as I can make out Tyson’s basic daily regime as outlaid by Cus D’Amato and what made him successful in his early career consisted of 30 minuets of roadwork at around 4am(running not jogging) and 10 rounds of sparing(very hard sparring with either no head guard or one with very little padding and an open face). surprisingly I understand that, D’Amato didn’t make ground work compulsory. However, Tyson DID do ground work such as press-ups, neck rolls and sit-ups, skipped, did pad work, heavy bag work, shadow boxed(at a very intense pace) and used the “peanut bag”. He also used a device called the “slip bag” to practice slipping punches and then immediately countering while the opponent was in range and exposed which was the basis of Tyson’s technique.I don’t know the number of reps or time spent on each exercise but I understand he was doing sets of 100 press-ups by the time he was 15. Much later on, while in prison, he started using weights and introduced it into his routine in preparation for his latter fights.  M247
 
Training

Joined: Mar 11, 2014
Posts: 1


TTBO record:
No record yet,Play Now!
   

Remember the Windows XP operating system? You can work with it online at GeekPrank.com and trick your friends.