Mike Tyson World Tour Media Workout Pictures

By
TysonTalk

Published: October 17, 2006

Source: fightnews

By Antonio Castro

All black trunks with the solid black shoes.

The look was the same, except for the white Michael Steele U.S. Senate tee
shirt.

Be ready for the same look this Friday night when Mike Tyson squares off in
a four round exhibition match against Corey “T-Rex” Sanders at the Chevrolet
Centre in Youngstown, Ohio.

“This is what I’m wearing for the fight” Tyson said after his media workout
at the Downtown Boxing Club in Youngstown today.

Jeff Fenech, Tyson’s trainer, put Mike through six makeshift rounds that
consisted of hitting the punching mitts and a punch shield.

Tyson looked like he was having fun in the ring, but he was not in a
talkative mood afterward.

The only talking was done by Corey Sanders, who graciously said: “You all
are going to see Friday night. Enjoy the show!”

When summoned to answer questions from the media, Tyson sent over a member
from his crew and politely gestured, “He’s going to do my talking for me.”

After roughly ten minutes, Tyson reluctantly agreed to approach where the
media was standing, but still offered no answers to any of the questions
that were posed. When asked how he felt, Tyson simply showed a smile and
gave a thumbs up sign. He continued to point to his shirt, showing his
support for Michael Steele.

This was a far cry from the Mike Tyson who was introduced at the kickoff
press conference in September to announce “Mike Tyson’s World Tour” event.
There, Tyson gladly answered any questions that were thrown his way.

Today’s version didn’t seem to be in a bad mood, this writer just thinks
that he wasn’t in a talkative mood.

Tyson appeared to be in a good mood as he arrived to the gym. After walking
in, he slowly looked at all the fight posters on the wall. During the
workout, Fenech continuously let Mike know that he was doing a great job and
after a series of hard shots to the body punch shield that he was holding,
he looked over to the 30-40 members of the media and gave a smile as if to
say “the power is still there.”



Update: added 15 more pictures to total of 19

More pictures and quotes available in the extended section of this post (click ‘Read More’ below).

Many members of the media felt slighted afterwards for not being able to
talk to Tyson.

This writer wasn’t one of them.

You don’t have to be a boxing fan to have heard some of the crazy stories
that surround Mike Tyson.

Here’s to thinking that maybe, just maybe, this is the new Mike Tyson that
he’s been telling us about. The one that “just wants to have fun.”

And honestly, how much fun is it to answer the question, “Mike, how do you
feel” for the one thousandth time?

I’m not sure what a new Mike Tyson will be like in the boxing ring, albeit
for an exhibition, but I’m ready to find out.

The first stop of “Mike Tyson’s World Tour” in Youngstown will be broadcast LIVE in North America on Cable and Satellite PAY-PER-VIEW for only $29.95 beginning at 10:30 pm ET/7:30 pm PT October 20th. Tickets, affordably priced at $25, $50, $100, and $200, are available at the Chevrolet Centre Box Office (330.746.5600) or at Gettix outlets (including online). Doors open at 7pm ET and the first non-televised bout is at 8pm.

Former World Heavyweight Champion Mike Tyson enters a ring for a light workout in Youngstown, Ohio, October 17, 2006. Tyson is preparing for his four-round exhibition bout on October 20th. REUTERS/Ron Kuntz

Tyson works with trainer Jeff Fenech during his light workout at a gym in Youngstown, Ohio, October 17, 2006. Tyson is preparing for his four-round exhibition bout on October 20th. REUTERS/Ron Kuntz

Former World Heavyweight Champion Mike Tyson (R) listens to instructions from trainer Jeff Fenech during his light workout at a gym in Youngstown, Ohio, October 17, 2006. Tyson is preparing for his four-round exhibition bout on October 20th. REUTERS/Ron Kuntz

Former World Heavyweight Champion Mike Tyson (R) works with trainer Jeff Fenech during his light workout at a gym in Youngstown, Ohio, October 17, 2006. Tyson is preparing for his four-round exhibition bout on October 20th. REUTERS/Ron Kuntz

Thanks to IRONMIKEFAN


‘T-Rex’ on Trinidad & Tyson Tour!

By Gary “Digital” Williams

Photos: Joe Bada

Corey “T-Rex”
Sanders is in the midst of the most eventful week of his boxing career.

Not only is the 6’6″ heavyweight from Washington,
DC involved in one of the most celebrated world tours since last year’s
Rolling Stones concert tour, but Sanders prepared for this Friday’s first
stop on the “Mike Tyson World Tour” by participating in his
first sanctioned boxing match in more than two years last Friday on the
islands of Trinidad and Tobago.

Sanders (23-11, 15 KO’s) lost a 10-round unanimous decision
to undefeated hometown boxer Kertson Manswell. Sanders lost the bout,
despite knocking Manswell down in the seventh round. Speaking from Youngstown,
OH, Sanders told Fightnews that there were some interesting situations
that took place after the knockdown.

“When I knocked him down, the referee counted to
eight,” Sanders said. “Then he said ‘eight’ again. Then he said
‘nine.’ Then he said nine again. Then he actually picked him up off the
mat.”

Despite the loss, Sanders said he is ready to resume a
career that begin in 1994 and includes a highly-regarded 10-round unanimous
decision loss to Andrew Golota in 1998 and an eighth-round knockout victory
over current WBC champion Oleg Maskaev in 2002. Sanders also said he has
overcome the detached retina he suffered in the Golota fight.

In fact, Sanders said it wasn’t his eye that kept him
out of boxing for more than two years; it was what he called “the
politics of boxing” that drove him from the sport.

“After the detached retina (which kept him out of
boxing for almost three years), I got back into boxing and had the longest
winning streak of my career (seven straight victories culminating with
the knockout of Maskaev),” Sanders said. “But I couldn’t get
the big fights I should have.”

During his time away from competitive boxing, Sanders
found a career as a sparring partner for Tyson, preparing him for his
last few bouts, including Tyson’s last contest, the loss to Kevin McBride
in Sanders’s home town of DC in June of 2005.

Sanders called working with Tyson “a beautiful experience,”
and said Tyson helped him as much as he helped Tyson.

“Truthfully, during the time we were in camp together,
that’s where I got my boxing confidence from,” Sanders said. “To
be in the ring with one of the greatest of all time and a heavyweight
champion; I’ve never been in the ring with someone who hit that hard.
It feels like he has bricks in both hands.”

Sanders said that his sparring work with Tyson led to
his involvement in the world tour, which he said, has been in the planning
stages since Tyson’s loss to McBride.

“Tyson’s trainer, Jeff Fenech, talked to me about
it after the bout in DC,” Sanders said. “But I didn’t think
much about it.”

In fact, Sanders said he found out about his involvement
in the tour the same way most people find their news; word of mouth.

“My sister-in-law called me and said ‘I saw your
picture on TV! You’re going to fight Mike Tyson,'” Sanders said.
“I said ‘are you sure that’s me? You know there are two (Corey and
Corrie) Sanders.’ She said, ‘they showed your picture.’ Then Jeff called
me afterwards and said I was in.”

“The tour will be beautiful because it will attract
a lot of people who didn’t get a chance to see Mike before,” Sanders
said. “He’s calmer than he was when he was going for a title. Plus,
young kids who were too young to really know Mike will get a chance to
see him and be a part of history. I’m just glad to be a part of it myself.”