Mike Tyson at Rahman-Maskaev 2 event

By
TysonTalk

Published: August 14, 2006

On August 12 Mike Tyson was at ringside as commentator during the Hasim Rahman vs Oleg Maskaev 2 event. Mike was commentating for the international HBO broadcast. Earlier Mike Tyson attended the weigh-in of the fighters.

In an interview by Boxingtalks G. Leon Bob Arum responded on Mikes performance as a commentator:

GL: Can you give us some thoughts on Mike Tyson doing the international commentary last weekend?

Bob Arum: “Rick Sierra told me he was sensational. He said that his insight was great, he was serious and he had nothing but accolades for Mike as did the foreign people I’ve spoken with so maybe we’ve got a future career for him.”

More pictures and quotes available in the extended section of this post (click ‘Read More‘ below).

LAS VEGAS – AUGUST 12: Former Heavyweight Champion Mike Tyson is seen ringside during Super Welterweight Bout between Vanes Martirosyan and Marcus Brooks August 12, 2006 at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. The fight is on the undercard for the WBC Heavyweight Championship between Oleg Maskaev and Hasim Rahman (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

LAS VEGAS – AUGUST 12: Former Heavyweight Champion Mike Tyson is seen ringside during Super Welterweight Bout between Vanes Martirosyan and Marcus Brooks August 12, 2006 at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. The fight is on the undercard for the WBC Heavyweight Championship between Oleg Maskaev and Hasim Rahman (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

LAS VEGAS – AUGUST 12: Former Heavyweight Champion Mike Tyson is seen ringside during Super Welterweight Bout between Vanes Martirosyan and Marcus Brooks August 12, 2006 at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. The fight is on the undercard for the WBC Heavyweight Championship between Oleg Maskaev and Hasim Rahman (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

LAS VEGAS – AUGUST 12: Former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson talks to Oleg Maskaev’s camp after Maskaev (originally of Kazakhstan) defeated Hasim Rahman in their WBC world heavyweight championship bout August 12, 2006 at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

Former heavyweight champion boxer Mike Tyson attends the weigh-in for Hasim Rahman and Oleg Maskaev fight at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas on Thursday, Aug. 10, 2006. Rahman will defend his WBC heavyweight title against Oleg Maskaev on Saturday at the Thomas & Mack Center. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken)

Former heavyweight champion boxer Mike Tyson attends the weigh-in for Hasim Rahman and Oleg Maskaev fight at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas on Thursday, Aug. 10, 2006. Rahman will defend his WBC heavyweight title against Oleg Maskaev on Saturday at the Thomas & Mack Center. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken)

WBC heavyweight champion Hasim Rahman, left, and Oleg Maskaev pose for photos with former champion Mike Tyson, center, following their weigh-in at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas on Thursday, Aug. 10, 2006. Rahman will defend his title against Maskaev on Saturday at the Thomas & Mack Center. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken)

Former heavywweight champion Mike Tyson, center, gestures to separate boxers Hasim Rahman, left, and Oleg Maskaev, right, as they face off following their weigh-in at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas on Thursday, Aug. 10, 2006. Rahman will defend his WBC heavyweight title against Maskaev on Saturday at the Thomas & Mack Center. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken)


Tyson a great U.S. hope?

Source: newsday

by Wallace Matthews

LAS VEGAS — The little boy looked up, wide-eyed, at his father. “Where is Rahman right now, you think?”

“Probably went to the hospital,” his father told him. “This is a hurt business, son.”

The boy looked crestfallen. “I’m sure he’s all right,” another man told him. “I spoke to him in the ring after the fight and he seemed fine.”

The boy’s name is Amir Tyson, and he is 9. His father’s name is Mike and he used to be heavyweight champion of the world. They had just watched Hasim Rahman get bullied and pounded out of his one-quarter share of the title Tyson once owned by a Russian named Oleg Maskaev in as brutal a fight as this depleted division has seen since Evander Holyfield left the same ring nine years earlier.

But that was a long time ago, and now, Tyson seems as relevant to contemporary boxing as Max Schmeling. He has not fought since he quit, midfight, to a ham-and-egger named Kevin McBride a year ago June, and shows no eagerness to return. “Boxing’s great,” Tyson said. “As long as you’re watching it from out here.”

Six weeks ago, Mike Tyson accomplished something most who knew him at his vicious peak figured would be impossible. He turned 40. He looks older, especially around his scarred and knotty eyebrows, and when he tells you again that he is retired, you believe him, because if this fight didn’t bring him back, nothing will.

The promoters of the Rahman-Maskaev fight had dubbed the bout “The Last Line of Defense,” a Cold War era reference to the fact that Rahman was the final American heavyweight champion, trying to hold the fort against an influx of Russians.

Before Saturday night, Rahman, who held the WBC title, was surrounded by Russian invaders: Vladimir Klitschko (IBF), Nikolai Valuev (WBA) and Sergei Liakhovich (WBO). Finally, you think, they have achieved the world domination Joseph McCarthy feared they would all along.

In truth, however, Maskaev, from Kazakhstan, lives in Staten Island. Klitschko, a Ukrainian, lives in Germany. Liakhovich, of Belarus, is based in Chicago. And it was Tyson who was boxing’s last hope for a resurgence of the division that drives its engine. After the bout, Tyson was asked if the thought of Maskaev — a crude, powerful brawler built for smashing concrete with a sledgehammer — holding a title tempted him to consider a comeback.

“Hell, yeah,” he admitted, grinning that golden gap-toothed smile. “But forget it,” he quickly added. “Ain’t no amount of money in the world can bring me back to this.”

No heavyweight in the Thomas & Mack Center got the ovation Tyson received from the crowd of 8,000, not Maskaev, who fought a courageous, even gallant fight, nor Rahman, who tried like hell to keep his title until he finally crumbled with a minute left in the 12-rounder, nor Lennox Lewis.

It was a roar of thanks for electrifyingly brutal nights long past, and perhaps also a plea for a return to glory for a division that seems irretrievably lost.

But Tyson is done, and so is Holyfield, even as he persists in his dangerous quest this weekend against some nobody in Dallas. The division is in the hands of the Russians now, and a callow kid named Calvin Brock, who is at best mildly talented, is being offered up as the next challenger for Maskaev, who will gobble him like caviar.

Heavyweight boxing is not America’s game anymore, its most talented fighters, it seems, being absorbed by the NFL, the NBA and probably Wall Street. It is not a game for the soft, or the lazy, or the privileged sons of rich fathers. “You ain’t never gonna have to get hurt like that,” Mike Tyson whispered to his young son. “Ain’t it great you don’t have to do this?”

Boxing’s truly last hope is that somewhere in this country, a kid Amir Tyson’s age is thinking, “Oh, yes I do.”

Thanks to IRONMIKEFAN and phxmikefan for the submission