Mike Tyson Starts Training Camp Tomorrow, returning to Valley

By
TysonTalk

Published: April 12, 2004

Tyson, the former undisputed heavyweight champion, was among the 6,000 fans at the Mandalay Bay Events Center on Saturday night when Brewster stopped Klitschko, the 1996 Olympic superheavyweight champion from Ukraine, in five rounds. Afterward, Tyson was serenaded by the promoter Don King. “We welcome you home,” King said to Tyson, who is suing him for $100 million.

Shelly Finkel, Tyson’s manager, stated that Mike Tyson will begin training camp tomorrow for a fight in either July or August.

Finkel wants Tyson to fight twice, then take on Joe Mesi, possibly in December at Madison Square Garden.

With the division in such a sad shape, many that did not want Tyson to fight again are screaming for Mike to come back.

Given
that three of the champions are Lamon Brewster, John Ruiz and Chris
Byrd, some of boxing’s most respected experts feel that Mike has a
chance, even at his current level, to defeat all three men.

Mike Tyson plans to resume training at the Phoenix gym that was once named after him.

“Sometime this week,” Tyson adviser Shelly Finkel said Sunday.

Tyson and Co. struck a deal last week for Tyson to begin closed
workouts at the old gym, now named Central Boxing, on west Van Buren
Street, near 17th Avenue.

Former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson and his girlfriend watch a welterweight title fight with Cory Spinks of St. Louis, Missouri and Zab Judah of Brooklyn, New York at the Mandalay Bay Events Center in Las Vegas, Nevada, April 10, 2004. Spinks retained his WBC/WBA/IBF titles by unanimous decision.

More quotes, pictures and video available in the extended section of this post (click ‘Read More‘ below).

Tyson has yet to sign for a fight, although there is speculation about
a July bout. If the former heavyweight champ resumes his career, his
decision comes in the wake of conflicting reports.

A few weeks ago, Tyson said he probably wouldn’t fight again. However, there are reports that he is almost broke.

Money always motivates Tyson, who has sued promoter Don King for $100 million.

The heavyweight division has to be another motivation. It’s wide open, which is another way of saying it is as weak as ever.

The absence of any real threat was evident again Saturday night when little-known Lamon Brewster, an 11-1 underdog, scored a fifth-round knockout of Wladimir Klitschko, who some believed was among the division’s best.

Brewster lost to Clifford Etienne,
who vanished from public consciousness before anybody knew how to
pronounce his last name. In Tyson’s last fight, Feb. 2, 2003, he
stopped Etienne in 49 seconds.

Meanwhile, Andrew Golota has somehow re-emerged as a contender. Exactly how Golota got a shot at International Boxing Federation champion Chris Byrd is another story, or perhaps another investigation.

Nevertheless, Golota will be in the ring with Byrd on Saturday in New
York. Golota, nicknamed the Foul Pole for low blows against Riddick Bowe, quit after three rounds against Tyson four years ago.

There’s not much out there. Then again, is there anything left of
37-year-old Tyson or the public’s fascination with him? It might take
awhile to forget the sight of him flat on his back, bloodied and
helpless, in the loss to Lennox Lewis two years ago.

After years of Tyson’s dissolute lifestyle, there’s also plenty of
reason to wonder whether he has the discipline to stay in a gym that
has undergone countless name changes since he first began training
there in 1998.

A glimpse of Tyson attending the post-fight conference of this boxing evening can be seen in boxingtalk.net post-conference clip here

Sources: boxingscene.com, azcentral.com, fightnews.com and The New York Times