Tyson's opponent promises to raise his game

By
TysonTalk

Published: July 15, 2004

Danny Williams blames himself for a lackluster boxing career, yet he intends to do something about it.

“I’ve been undermotivated,” he said this week from New York, where he’s training for a July 30 fight against Mike Tyson in Louisville. “I’ve never fought at the highest level, but I’m going to raise my game to the occasion.”

The occasion is significant, as Williams well knows. He could defeat Tyson and become a star, or he could lose and slip back into oblivion.

“By any means necessary, I will win this fight,” he said. “I believe I have the power to knock him out (and) I’m going to outbox him because of my height.

“I am looking for a war and I’m looking to box him as well.”

Williams is 31-3 with 26 knockouts but a three-time loser in the past couple of years because of a questionable chin. As he admitted (in Wednesday’s Sun), he was selected for this fight by Tyson’s handlers because they expect him to be knocked out by the former heavyweight champion.

Tyson is 50-4 with 45 KOs but has not fought in 18 months. He’s training in Phoenix and apparently doing well in spite of reportedly being hampered by back spasms.

“Tyson only knows one way to fight,” Williams said, aware that Tyson will come after him from the opening bell. “It’s an effective way to fight, but it’s only one way.”

He feels if he can stay busy and keep moving, he could wear Tyson out.

Their pay-per-view fight came as a godsend to Williams, an Englishman who was pushed into the sport at the age of 8 by his father.

“I felt like it was Christmas and my birthday at the same time,” he said of receiving the news that he would have the role as Tyson’s opponent.

Trained by Dwight Yard, Williams is utilizing journeyman Sherman Williams as a sparring partner and will gain the services of an additional sparring partner, Clifford Etienne, next week. Etienne lost by first-round knockout to Tyson in Tyson’s most recent fight, Feb. 22, 2003 in Memphis.

Williams has also been in contact with fellow Englishman Frank Bruno, who twice lost to Tyson by knockout. He said Bruno has advised him on how to recognize and avoid Tyson’s “telegraphed” punches.

“Camp’s going great,” Williams reiterated, feeling as if his skills and devotion to his craft are peaking at just the right time.

By: Dean Juipe

Source: lasvegassun